Newsroom

<< <  Page 3 of 6  > >>

As the academic year opens at colleges across the country, one important group of students will be underrepresented in classrooms: returning adults. The missing students may have both the abilities and the motivation to pursue degrees. But many are shut out of higher education because of debt owed to schools they attended years, even decades, earlier.
More ...

Join us for a conversation featuring Harlem resident and best-selling author Richard Price, with leaders from three independent not-for-profit programs offering literacy, education, drug, and anti-gun guidance to our most disadvantaged children and young people.


More ...

Tamara Thompson Moore was at a crossroads in her life when she was pressured, she says, to apply for the Odyssey Project.
More ...

Port Townsend, WA: For Port Townsend City Council, two young new council members will replace two who are retiring. For Position 6, Amy Smith, beat her opponent, by a 71.5 percent to 28 percent margin. Amy is a graduate of the Jefferson Clemente Course: "I took this course as a wayward youth; it changed my life."


More ...

Free Minds, a program of Foundation Communities, is a free, 6 credit college humanities course, for mostly low-income adults. The program is unique because most adults who return to school take skill-based courses, rather than humanities courses. To lower common barriers to education, Free Minds also provides a warm dinner before every evening class, and free childcare.
More ...

This is one of the four Clemente Courses in Massachusetts sponsored by Mass Humanities.


More ...

Halifax Humanities helps those who can’t afford higher education


More ...

WORCESTER – After the Worcester Art Museum closed its doors to the public for the day last Tuesday, a small group of scholars set out on a private tour.
More ...

Should the state allow undocumented immigrants to pay in-state tuition rates?


More ...

Aristotle described agriculture as “the first and most proper parts of domestic management” in his Poetics. Kafi Dixon, a farmer and student of the Clemente Course, understands the primacy of food, and yet it is her study of the humanities that allowed her to pursue her dream of providing healthy food to her community.
More ...

Since 2001, I have taught American history in the Boston Clemente Course, a college humanities program accredited by Bard College and offered free of charge to lower income adults through the Codman Square Health Center in Dorchester, Massachusetts. I also teach at Harvard. The driving distance between Harvard Square and Codman Square is less than eight miles, but these neighborhoods can sometimes feel like they're a world apart.
More ...

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The mentor and mentee sat in a room in the Latin American Youth Center, dreaming of a future neither knew how to fully attain.

“How many jobs do you think you’ve applied for?” Jaime Roberts asked her mentee.

Manuel Hernandez laughed nervously. The question seemed so important, but the goal seemed so futile.

“I stopped counting,” Hernandez said. “Maybe 12? Maybe more?”


More ...

She may be an expert on Jane Austen and 19th century literature, but University of Wisconsin-Madison English Professor Emily Auerbach's real passion is helping people use education as a springboard out of poverty.
More ...

Please join me in congratulating Associate Professor Mark Santow from the History Department as the May recipient of CARES (Chancellor's Award Recognizing Excellence in Service).
More ...

There is a recurring debate that has spilled onto the pages of mainstream media lately about the value of studying the humanities and whether the humanities are "in decline." The two issues are connected, as cultural critic Benjamin Winterhalter pointed out in a terrific essay in The Atlantic online earlier this summer.
More ...

We Are One Inside Out Project and Clemente Humanities course builds student confidence, fosters future leaders.
More ...

For years, Tim McCarthy has lectured students in Dorchester, in a program where he now has an endowed chair. Read Harvard Gazette Story


A group of East High School students are turning their school “Inside Out” this weekend by showcasing the rich ethnic diversity found at their school. Their intent is to encourage mutual respect and unity and to spark conversation about the changing face of Salt Lake City.

The students are members of the new Clemente Humanities course taught at East High and led by Jorge Rojas.

Read more at 24saltlake.com


Last month, I attended a college-level philosophy class at LAYC where students discussed Plato's concept of school as a place to create and question. Philosophy classes at LAYC? Read post on layc-dc.org.


The idea came to him in prison. At work in the early 1990s on a book about poverty in America, Earl Shorris, X’54, met an inmate named Viniece Walker. He asked her, "Why do you think people are poor?"

Read Article



© The Clemente Course in the Humanities℠, Inc. - All Rights Reserved. | Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities | Website design Totera Systems